Saturday, July 23, 2016

The Creeper and The Avengers



I wrote a few days ago of the difficulty in translating Moon Knight's costume to live action.  That;s nothing compared to the challenge of depicting a real-life Creeper uniform.  The yellow, the shag rug, the green hair, the striped trunks... I always thought he looked cool in the comics but I don't know if I would be able to take a live version seriously. I will say I have seen some decent cosplay of the character.

7 comments:

Cary Killingbeck said...

With allies like the Creeper, the Avengers don't need enemies. LOL!

Sonofjack Well said...

Always love seeing the Creeper! Alas though, I agree that he would not work in live action....

Bob Greenwade said...

"Seriously"? Did you actually say -- or, rather, mean to imply -- that you'd expect the Creeper's costume to help one take him... seriously?

(I think that part of the point -- albeit not likely the original intent -- behind his look is that he looks ridiculous and his foes will tend to underestimate him, at least until he gets a rep. At least, that's how I'd play it for a TV show.)

Anonymous said...

Actually, like Barbara Gordon's Batgirl, the Silver Age version of the Creeper's origin had investigative reporter Jack Ryder donning the costume as a way of crashing some organized criminal's masquerade party. The latter apparently having abducted some VIP scientist for a certain left-wing foreign power.*

The costume became part of him when the ill-fated scientist subcutaneously implanted his invention--some kind of holographic cloaking device--within the badly injured Jack. The rest is overly ret-conned history.



*Not to mention any names. But, their initials were USSR. ;-)

Simreeve said...

This reminds we of when the Creeper was first encountered by the post-Legends version of the Justice League:

"What are you doing up there?"
"I think it's the Watusi."


^_^

Anonymous said...

Bob and other anon, the Creeper I remember reading in my youth combined his unusual look with a convincing maniacal laugh and over the top dialogue to convince crooks they were dealing with a madman so they would give up in fear. A bit like the Batman choosing the bat theme to frighten criminals. Unlike the Joker, he was serious and sane underneath that weird appearance.

Cary Killingbeck said...

At 2nd Anon: You're right. His laugh was more like that adopted by Kent Allard as the Shadow (aka "Lamont Cranston"). Check out the Alec Baldwin movie from 1994, if you want to see what I mean.

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