Monday, November 26, 2012

The New Teen Titans Vs. Galactus



The New Teen Titans #1-50 by Marv Wolfman and George Perez were superhero comics at their best.  It is sad that this group of characters has been forced apart when they worked so well together.  These days, Dick Grayson is too busy with the Batman crew to think about a team, Starfire, Cyborg, Changeling and Raven all seem to have undergone history transplants and have been scattered to different sections of the DCU, and Donna Troy and Wally West remain missing in action.  Is that any way to treat the stars of your flaghip title from the 80's?  Hopefully DC will find a way to reunite this crew some day.


6 comments:

John Small said...

As a fan of the original Titans and the New Titans issues you cite here, this stands as one of my favorites among your recent postings. Great stuff, and I agree wholeheartedly with your wish to see this team reunite.

Incidentally, I've been noodling around with ideas of my own again. Here's the most recent:

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151157407212817&set=a.10150099098427817.270045.750037816&type=1&theater

Ross said...

John whenever I click those links of yours I get a page that says "This Content is Currently Unavailable"

worldmusic said...

"Which" of the Titans would most likely be chosen to be a Herald for Galactus? Duh....thats a no brainer- STARFIRE of course!!! And a Starfire vs. Silver Surfer (or Ms. Marvel) cover is looooong overdue, BTW.

Dr. Steroids said...

The '80s were the Platinum age of comics, and this goes for the entire industry. Not sure what you would want to call the late '90s and post-9/11 years, but I have only brought graphic novels from independant publishers since 1998.

pblfsda said...

Actually, Overstreet has been using the term "Platinum Age" to describe the age preceding super-heroes, slightly overlapping the beginning of the Golden Age. It starts with regularly recurring newspaper strip characters in the 1880's and ends when Superman appears in Action #1.

They refer to the 1980's as the Copper Age, characterized by independent publishers who sell directly to fans through conventions and hobby stores, circumventing the newsstand distribution system. Because of the changes to technology, initially in coloring and eventually in every aspect of production, I would call everything since the mid-1990's the Digital Age.

Isaac said...

Ross, you sure that's Galactus and not Dan Didio?

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